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September 26, 2022 | Local, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR

Canadian military faces shortage of recruits: `We are in an applicant crisis’ - National | Globalnews.ca

Recruitment cratered during the first year of COVID-19 as the military shuttered recruiting and training centres, in which only 2,000 people were enrolled in 2020-21.

https://globalnews.ca/news/9154586/canadian-military-shortage-of-recruits/

On the same subject

  • Defence Minister Anita Anand Announces Enhancements to RCAF Mobility Capabilities to Support Ukraine and Other Global Missions

    September 26, 2022 | Local, Aerospace

    Defence Minister Anita Anand Announces Enhancements to RCAF Mobility Capabilities to Support Ukraine and Other Global Missions

    September 26, 2022 – Ottawa, Ontario – National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces Today, Defence Minister Anita Anand announced that the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) is enhancing its air mobility operations based in Europe as it conducts ongoing missions there and around the world. Since late March 2022, RCAF members operating two CC-130J Hercules aircraft have been conducting operations from a hub based out of Prestwick, Scotland. The hub's personnel have now delivered 4 million pounds of cargo – largely military aid in support of Ukraine. To increase capacity and operational flexibility, Canada is adding a third CC-130J Hercules aircraft to the detachment, and deploying support personnel responsible for maintenance, cargo movements and administration. The Air Mobility Detachment in Prestwick will be made up of approximately 55 Canadian Armed Forces members with further augmentation based on operational tempo. When necessary, CC-177 Globemaster crews will continue to utilize the hub's resources to increase mission efficiency and flexibility. To reflect this change, the Prestwick Tactical Airlift Detachment will now be known as an Air Mobility Detachment. This name change is consistent with the increased frequency of flights and use of CC-177 air mobility aircraft. Bolstering the RCAF's operations hub will increase Canada's ability to carry out support missions throughout Europe, including the delivery of Ukraine-bound military aid. This augmentation will also increase Canada's ability to carry out missions in the Middle East and Africa on a periodic or as-required basis. As Ukraine defends itself from Russia's illegal and unjustifiable invasion, Canada will continue to provide Ukraine with comprehensive military assistance. https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/news/2022/09/defence-minister-anita-anand-announces-enhancements-to-rcaf-mobility-capabilities-to-support-ukraine-and-other-global-missions.html

  • How Canada can leverage Biden's agenda as part of government relations reset

    January 25, 2021 | Local, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    How Canada can leverage Biden's agenda as part of government relations reset

    Government can put focus on opportunities in new presidential agenda rather than on old irritants Colin Robertson · for CBC News Opinion · Posted: Jan 19, 2021 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: January 19 This column is an opinion by Colin Robertson, a former Canadian diplomat and now vice-president and fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. For more information about CBC's Opinion section, please see the FAQ. Joe Biden's return to the White House, this time as president, gives Canada a chance to reset what has been a tempestuous ride with Donald Trump. Biden has set himself a formidable to-do list: the pandemic; economic recovery; climate; racial justice; restoring democracy. For Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's first meeting with Biden after his inauguration, the government needs to look closely at that agenda. Rather than focusing on the perennial irritants, it should identify where Canada can offer help and solutions, because we share many of these challenges. Biden's immediate priority is vaccinating Americans so the country can recover socially and economically from COVID-19, and Trudeau has the same focus. The multilateral response to the pandemic could have been much more effective and would have benefited all if our two nations had collaborated from the outset. But it's not too late to start. Some of our best practices will also have application in hard-pressed developing nations, and what better demonstration that "America is back" and "ready to lead the world," as Biden put it, than to work closer with Canada and share what we have jointly learned about dealing with this virus. On climate, if Biden rejoins the Paris Agreement as promised, Canada and the U.S. will be back in sync in terms of emission-reduction targets. Together, we need to look to November's Glasgow conference and what we want to accomplish there, as it will be both a stock-taking of Paris commitments and a setting of new goals. With this in mind, Trudeau should offer to lead a North American approach to carbon pricing, including instituting a border tax on imports from those nations that don't meet their climate commitments. Closer collaboration would also involve identifying best practices and areas for shared research, including initiatives at the state and provincial level. If Mexico were asked to join in, it would go a long way to reviving North American collaboration in other areas as well, like immigration and addressing some of the troubles involving Mexico's Central American neighbours. On the issue of mutual defence, unlike Trump, Biden has indicated he believes in collective security and that he embraces NATO. Meanwhile, our binational NORAD agreement needs renewal, and an Arctic strategy is the missing piece in Canada's defence policy. American presidents from Ronald Reagan on have told us that if Canada claims sovereignty over the North, then we must exercise it. If we dither, the U.S. will set the parameters for us. To avoid this, we need to quickly take the lead in proposing a joint strategy. Reinvesting in our Arctic would also spark a northern economic renaissance, as well as secure the critical minerals vital to advanced manufacturing. Joining Biden's proposed club of democracies also makes sense, especially if it focuses on human rights, development goals, setting digital standards, and strengthening nascent democracies. Likewise, standing up to the authoritarians, especially China, is overdue. China's a la carte approach to multilateralism means scooping up the benefits of globalization while ignoring the rules and conventions of global institutions. As a result, China will likely dominate the Biden administration's foreign and security policy deliberations. As part of those deliberations, Canada needs President Biden to promise that any deal lifting the U.S. extradition request for Meng Wanzhou will include freeing the two Michaels – Canadians Kovrig and Spavor, detained in China since December 2018. With Canada having about 300,000 expatriates at risk in Hong Kong, we should also offer to co-lead, with Britain, a G7 approach to sustaining the liberties that China guaranteed to Hong Kong. And we must carefully strategize confrontations involving the U.S. itself. In his first conversation with the president-elect on Nov. 9 after the U.S. election, Prime Minister Trudeau pressed him on the Keystone XL pipeline that Biden has repeatedly pledged to rescind. The arguments supporting Keystone XL are unchanged: as one of 70 pipelines that crisscross our border, it safely supplements American energy independence with a secure and reliable supply of oil. And innovations by oilsands producers have significantly reduced the industry's environmental footprint. Biden already knows all this. But could he really be expected to go back on his promise to environmentalists, a key constituency in his fragile Democratic government? Leading with your chin is a bad idea, and Canada needs to be pragmatic. Indeed, reports Sunday indicated that Biden plans to rescind permission for the pipeline in his first day in office. If that turns out to be the case, Keystone XL is an important issue that requires ongoing attention through different levels of government, but we also need to be realistic in our expectations. The Harper government made Keystone XL the litmus test of its relationship with the Obama administration and it was a mistake, frustrating progress on other issues. Meanwhile, a pipeline we should be vigorously defending is the 65-year-old Line 5 that Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer wants closed. This pipeline supplies about 45 per cent of the crude oil used by Ontario and Quebec. Let's also be realistic about Buy American, which is integral to Biden's trillion-dollar Made in America and Build Back Better initiatives. It's equally unlikely that he'll back away from these plans, but we should remember how Canada finessed former president Barack Obama's big build economic recovery initiative. With state-level procurement outside of the NAFTA deal, then-prime minister Stephen Harper turned to the Council of the Federation. Led by premiers Brad Wall and Jean Charest, they negotiated a reciprocity agreement with their governor counterparts that gave Canadians a piece of the pie. Keystone XL and Buy America remind us that our close, deep and profitable U.S. trade relationship requires a calibrated approach involving different levels of government. Several of the provinces have representation in Washington. Quebec has long had offices throughout the U.S., for example, and provincial efforts complement those of our Embassy and consulates; indeed on issues like Keystone they effectively lead. The Canadian tendency to push it all to the top-level leaders is self-defeating. When presidents meet with prime ministers, they expect top-table discussions befitting G7 and G20 leaders. Effective relations with the new Biden administration will mean dealing with problems at the appropriate level – including cabinet officers, premiers and governors, and our ambassadors. This obliges us to invest in our diplomatic service so that we can bring their intelligence-gathering to the negotiating table. The new U.S. administration wants to reset relationships with its friends and allies. By seizing this opportunity and being creative in identifying solutions to our shared interests, as well as leveraging opportunities through multiple levels of government, we ultimately advance Canadian interests. A welcome mat at the White House magnifies Canada's influence with the rest of the world. https://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/opinion-biden-trudeau-relations-1.5873231

  • Australian F-18s being considered by Canada will need overhaul to keep flying

    November 16, 2017 | Local, Aerospace

    Australian F-18s being considered by Canada will need overhaul to keep flying

    Canada is waiting to hear back from Australia on its offer to purchase F-18s from that country. The Australian planes would be added to the RCAF's flight line to shore up the existing fleet of CF-18s. But if that deal does proceed the RCAF expects that structural work will have to be done to extend the lives of the planes. RCAF commander Lt.-Gen. Michael Hood suggested to Defense News and FlightGlobal that L-3 in Quebec would get any upgrade contract since that firm has done similar work for the airforce on its existing CF-18s. But Hood told Defense News at the Dubai airshow that even with that work to be done, the RCAF would be able to acquire the Australian aircraft “within the next couple of years” once a decision is made. http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/australian-f-18s-being-considered-by-canada-to-need-overhaul-to-keep-flying?utm_source=skies-daily-news-news-from-the-web

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