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February 14, 2019 | Local, Land

Canadian Army credits Liberals for TAPV instead of Conservatives - new roles for vehicle added

There seems to be some revisionism underway in the Canadian Army about the Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) program as well as changes to the role of the wheeled vehicle.

When it was originally announced part of the stated goal of the TAPV was to take on the role of reconnaissance, with 193 of the vehicles being a reconnaissance variant that would replace the Army's Coyote vehicle. The remaining 307 TAPVs would serve as armoured personnel carriers for battlefield troop transportation, according to the Army.

In addition, the $1.2 billion project, when it was announced in 2012, was clearly part of the Conservative government's defence program (The original TAPV plans also emerged under the Conservatives in 2008/2009).

The situation has changed in the meantime. The Army says it is expanding the role of the vehicle. The TAPV is being assigned to headquarters and military police units for use as protected and mobile transport. It will be used as well for command and control, VIP transport and patrolling.

As for the more sophisticated reconnaissance capability fielded by the Coyotes, the Army notes that it has the new LAV 6 and its Reconnaissance Surveillance System (LRSS) Project.

“The remaining Coyote fleet will be divested upon the fielding of the LAV 6.0 LRSS which are expected to be delivered in 2021 and 2022,” it added in an email to Postmedia.

As for the TAPV project, as pointed out below in the Army Facebook posting last year, that program is now being credited to the Liberal government and its Strong, Secure and Engaged defence policy.

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/canadian-army-credits-liberals-for-tapv-instead-of-conservatives-new-roles-for-vehicle-added

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