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June 5, 2023 | Local, Land

An 'embarrassing' gear shortage has Canadian troops in Latvia buying their own helmets | CBC News

Canadian troops in Latvia have been buying their own ballistic helmets with better ear protection and are looking at their allies with envy as Danish soldiers arrive with more modern Canadian-made weapons. It is a sign that the army’s problems with equipping its battle group in the Baltic go beyond the absence of modern anti-tank and anti-aircraft weapons.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canadian-soliders-latvia-equipment-helmets-1.6864290

On the same subject

  • New surveillance aircraft for Canadian special forces to start arriving later this year

    May 16, 2023 | Local, Aerospace

    New surveillance aircraft for Canadian special forces to start arriving later this year

    The Beechcraft King Air planes will be outfitted with sensors and equipment to intercept cellphone and other electronic transmissions.

  • Simulation Technologies & Training for Law Enforcement

    September 17, 2018 | Local, Security

    Simulation Technologies & Training for Law Enforcement

    CASEY BRUNELLE © 2018 FrontLine (Vol 15, No 4) The realities of modern frontline policing – from increasingly broad and demanding operational mandates and changing environmental constraints, to the constant pressure of real-time public scrutiny – have never been more challenging. Traditional crime prevention and response have long been coupled with the requirements of community-oriented public safety, counter-terrorism measures. Lately that has further included the implications of social media and the instantaneous reporting of officers' actions, in some cases spread worldwide before formal inquiries can even begin. Effective training solutions, more so than ever before, rely on a holistic and judgmental regime that can replicate to the best possible degree the tactical challenges of response, the fluidity of operational changes on the ground, and the importance of informed decision-making strategies that keeps the safety of the public at the forefront of all policing actions. In an era of hyper-connectivity, public scrutiny can sometimes lead to denouncements of police actions within minutes, through traditional and novel media alike, often riddled with accusations of institutionalized racism, systemic brutality, and discretionary justice. These shifts in technology and the underlying public culture are not exclusive to the United States; they are increasingly fluid game-changers throughout the West and law enforcement policymakers and frontline officers rarely go a day without considering their implications or witnessing their consequences for themselves. There is no doubt that this is will have a positive result in the long run, and simulated training is being seen as one of the most efficient and cost-effective ways to ensure the right decision-making processes become ingrained. Increasingly, law enforcement agencies at the local, provincial, and national level are recognizing the utility of replicating these fluid challenges with advanced simulations and virtual and augmented reality technologies. From the use of wireless small arms platforms (such as BlueFire technology from Meggitt Training System) and simulators of cruisers for high-speed pursuits (such as the “souped up” version from General Electric), to customizable hardware that can be used to construct any building interiors at will (as in the flexibility offered by Mobile Police Training Structures), simulations technology has become one of the most effective and cost-efficient measures in ensuring that police are as equipped as possible to handle the evolving challenges of their profession. Full article: https://defence.frontline.online/article/2018/4/10362

  • Canada’s domestic spy agency looking to hire hackers and data scientists

    January 4, 2019 | Local, C4ISR, Security

    Canada’s domestic spy agency looking to hire hackers and data scientists

    By ALEX BOUTILIER Ottawa Bureau OTTAWA–Canada's domestic spy agency is in the market for hackers. The Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) wants to hire a “network exploitation analyst” to assist the agency in “cyber investigative activities.” The successful candidate will be expected to build new tools for the spy agency to carry out electronic snooping, develop and maintain a database of “malware” exploits, and provide analysis of “technical artifacts,” according to the job posting. CSIS, which investigates activities suspected of constituting threats to national security, can and routinely does rely on its sister agency, the Communication Security Establishment (CSE), for high-tech help with its espionage efforts. While CSE is focused on gathering foreign intelligence and is forbidden from spying on Canadians, it can assist domestic law enforcement and intelligence agencies with their own investigations. But one spy watcher said CSIS building up an in-house capability for cyber spying may have less to do with traditional espionage than with its new powers actually to disrupt threats to Canada. Ronald Deibert, the director of Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto's Munk School of Global Affairs, said he's not surprised CSIS is in the market for hackers — state-sponsored hacking is on the rise, and the Liberal government's new national security laws empower Canada's spy agencies to take part. But Deibert, one of Canada's foremost cybersecurity researchers, told the Star that he has significant concerns about the agencies' new electronic powers. “While (Liberal national security bill) C-59 placed some limits and provided some clarity on what those disruption powers would entail, the prospect of CSIS hacking in any form should give everyone pause, especially because there is still a lot of uncertainty around what that mandate would allow,” Deibert said in an email. “Practically speaking, CSIS hacking could include computer network interference in a foreign election process, compromising the integrity of important digital tools that Canadians rely on for everyday privacy and security, creating fake online personas and using them to spread disinformation and more.” John Townsend, a spokesperson for the spy agency, said Bill C-59 gives the agency “clear legislative authority” for the collection and analysis of information not “directly or immediately” related to national security threats. Full article: https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2019/01/03/canadas-domestic-spy-agency-looking-to-hire-hackers-and-data-scientists.html

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